Tag Archives: container gardening

Garden Bloggers Featured on Wayfair.com

I was recently asked by Wayfair.com to contribute a photo of my favorite planter, and to answer some questions related to container gardening  for their section on garden planters. Of course, I was thrilled to be among the garden bloggers invited. Here’s my photo that’s featured on their site:

The section of garden bloggers tips on container gardening went live today on Wayfair.com. Click right here to see it.

 

The planter in the photo was given to me for my birthday a year or so ago by my dear friend, Becky Witherby. She had put a red bromeliad in it. I had put that bromeliad in the ground in my back yard garden only a few days before Wayfair’s invitation arrived in my inbox. Perfect timing, as I then had an empty planter. I’m now waiting with baited breath for the bromeliad to bloom again.

I love the gorgeous blue of this planter. Becky made a great choice. Thank you again, Becky.

Wayfair provided this clip from their site for all of us to add to our blogs. If you enjoy container gardening, you may find it useful:

 

What’s Wrong with My Tomatoes?

Gina McG. texted me this photo and asked, “What’s Wrong with My Tomatoes?”

I texted back:  “This looks like to much water, which is a common problem, especially with all the rain we’ve had. Thank goodness we only get stretch marks when we grow too fast!”

Gina replied that she was growing her tomatoes in containers inside her screened-in lanai.  Below, I have elaborated on the information I gave her.

Gina's Mater

At the time this photo was taken, we had had more than our fair share of rain. Too much water causes rapid growth for many plants. The tomatoes were growing faster than their skins could stretch, which caused the skins to split open.

If the splits are very recent, and are not too large, you can simply cut away the exposed portion of the tomato, and eat the remainder.  If you have been away for a few days, and the problem has gone unnoticed,  pests and/or disease could have infiltrated most or all of the tomato. In that case, simply toss it — preferably into your compost bin. From what I can see in this photo, I believe the top half of this one should be trashed. Maybe all of it, but I wouldn’t know for sure without cutting into it and seeing the inside.

Unfortunately, there is not much we can do about too much rain on our gardens. On the other hand, if you are growing your ‘maters in containers, simply take them into a covered area whenever they have had too much rain.

During extremely hot weather, container-grown plants will need more water than those planted in the ground. A good way to monitor moisture is to put your finger into the soil. If the top inch is dry, add some water. Use a saucer to catch the water that drains out of the bottom of the container. The plant will soak up water from the saucer, BUT be sure to pour off any water that remains in the saucer after about 30 minutes has passed, as most plants don’t like wet feet (aka, roots).