Tag Archives: when to fertilize palms

When Should Palms Be Fertilized?

Lynne W. asked, “When should we fertilize our palms?

It has taken quite some time to get this blog up and running, and it has been quite a while since Lynne asked this question, so I gave her an immediate verbal reply. It is a great question for those new to the area, so it is the topic of my first blog post. I have learned more in recent months, so I will elaborate a bit.

Date Palm - mlm c@

In a palm clinic I learned that palms should be fertilized 3 times per year between March 15 and September 15. That gives us 7 months over which to distribute 3 fertilizations. Be sure to use 8-2-12. Even better is 8-2-12 +4. These numbers can be thought of by their chemical symbols “NPK”: (Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P), Potassium (K). The +4 is a combination of the trace minerals that palms also need. I tried Ace Hardware in Wildwood, but they had only 4-1-6. Not wanting to drive up to Lowe’s or Home Depot, we bought the 4-1-6 (exactly half of the strength of 8-2-12) and used twice as much.

Do not use fertilizer stakes for palms. Do not use Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) on your palms, as this can create a fatal potassium deficiency.

It is recommended that we use 1½ lbs. per 100 sq. ft. of canopy. The canopy is the land beneath the leaves of a palm, or any tree. The outer edge of the canopy is often called the “drip line” because it is within that area that water will drip off the branches of any tree. All trees and shrubs should also be mulched out to the drip line with a good organic mulch that will gradually decompose and nourish the soil. This is especially important due to the very poor soil in this area, and the very shallow roots of plants throughout the southeastern United States, particularly, palms, azaleas, and all tropical plants. Keep mulch to no more than 6 inches deep around the trunk of any tree.

Important: It IS okay to use palm fertilizer on turf grass. It IS NOT okay to use fertilizer intended for turf grass on your palms. Palms have shallow roots that extend laterally about 50 feet, with the most important roots being within the top 6 inches of soil. Most of our neighborhoods have small lots, so for many of us, our palm roots extend under our entire yards. It is more expensive to fertilize the yard with palm food, but in the long run, it may not be, if a mature palm has to be replaced.

Post your questions as a comment, or send questions to inthegarden.maria@gmail.com.